Search for Handouts and Resources:

American Academy of Pediatrics Logo

  • Inhaled and Intranasal Corticosteroids and Your Child

    If your child has asthma or allergic rhinitis (hay fever), your pediatrician may prescribe a corticosteroid, also commonly referred to as a steroid. These medicines are the best available to decrease the swelling and irritation (inflammation) that occurs with persistent asthma or allergy. They are not

    Read More
  • Insect Repellents: What Parents Need to Know

    Mosquitoes, biting flies, and tick bites can make children miserable. While most children have only mild reactions to insect bites, some children can become very sick. Some insects carry dangerous germs such as West Nile virus, Lyme disease bacteria, and Rocky Mountain spotted fever bacteria.

    Read More
  • Is Your Toddler Communicating With You?

    Your baby is able to communicate with you long before he or she speaks a single word! A baby's cry, smile, and responses to you help you to understand his or her needs. In this publication the American Academy of Pediatrics shares information about how children communicate and what to do when there are

    Read More
  • Jaundice and Your Newborn

    Congratulations on the birth of your new baby!

    Read More
  • Keep Your Family Safe: Fire Safety and Burn Prevention at Home

    Fires and burns cause almost 4,000 deaths and about 20,000 hospitalizations every year. Winter is an especially dangerous time, as space heaters, fireplaces, and candles get more use in the home. It is no surprise that fires in the home are more common between December and February. However, you might

    Read More
  • Lead Is a Poison: What You Need to Know

    Lead in the body can affect child development and behavior. Lead is a metal that is found in a lot of places. Though you can't usually see it, there are things you can do to prevent your child from being exposed to lead. No safe level of lead has been identified for children. Children are at highest

    Read More
  • Lyme Disease

    Lyme disease is an important public health problem in some areas of the United States. Since its discovery in Lyme, CT, in 1975, thousands of cases of the disease have been reported across the United States and around the world. By knowing more about the disease and how to prevent it, you can help keep

    Read More
  • Managing Chronic Health Needs in Child Care and Schools—Preterm Newborns (Preemies): An Overview

    One in 10 babies (9.6%) was born prematurely in the United States in 2016.

    Read More
  • Medicine and the Media: How to Make Sense of the Messages

    Your child is sick or hurt and the first thought on your mind is, “How can I make my child better?” That's natural. No parent wants his or her child to suffer. So how do you decide what medicines to give or treatments to try?

    Read More
  • Middle Ear Fluid and Your Child

    The middle ear is the space behind the eardrum that is usually filled with air. When a child has middle ear fluid (otitis media with effusion), it means that a watery or mucus-like fluid has collected in the middle ear. Otitis media means middle ear inflammation, and effusion means fluid.

    Read More
  • Minor Head Injuries in Children

    Almost all children bump their heads every now and then. While these injuries can be upsetting, most head injuries are minor and do not cause serious problems. In very rare cases, problems can occur after a minor bump on the head. This publication was written by the American Academy of Pediatrics to

    Read More
  • Newborn Hearing Screening and Your Baby

    Before you bring your newborn home from the hospital, your baby needs to have a hearing screening.

    Read More
  • Pneumococcal Infections

    Meningitis (brain), Bacteremia (bloodstream), Pneumonia (lungs), Sinusitis (sinus membranes), and Otitis media (ears). These infections can be dangerous to very young children, the elderly, and people with certain high-risk health conditions.

    Read More
  • Protect Your Child From Poison

    Children can get very sick if they come in contact with medicines, household products, pesticides, chemicals, or cosmetics. This can happen at any age and can cause serious reactions. However, most children who come in contact with these things are not permanently hurt if they are treated right away.

    Read More
  • Protect Your Child…Prevent Poisoning

    Young children may put anything in their mouths. This is part of learning. Many household products can be poisonous if swallowed, if in contact with the skin or eyes, or if inhaled.

    Read More
  • Protect Yourself and Help Protect Your Baby: Information for New Moms on the Tdap Vaccine

    Congratulations on your new baby! Your baby is the greatest gift you will ever receive. One of your biggest jobs as a parent is to keep your child safe and healthy. One way do this is to make sure your children get all the immunizations they need to protect them from different diseases. But did you know

    Read More
  • Ratings: Making Healthy Media Choices

    Research has shown that children are influenced by what they see and hear, especially at very young ages. To help parents make informed choices about what their children see and hear, many entertainment companies use ratings systems. Ratings give parents more information about the content of television

    Read More
  • Right From the Start: ABCs of Good Nutrition for Young Children

    As a parent, you are interested in your child's health. Your role is to provide healthy food in appropriate portions, and your child's role is to decide how much to eat. That is why it is important to understand how to provide healthy choices for your child.

    Read More
  • Safe Sleep and Your Baby: How Parents Can Reduce the Risk of SIDS and Suffocation

    Many infants die during sleep from unsafe sleep environments. Some of these deaths are from entrapment, suffocation, and strangulation. Some infants die from sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS). However, there are ways for parents to keep their sleeping baby safe.

    Read More
  • Safety of Blood Transfusions

    Because of illness or injury, some children need to receive transfusions of blood and blood products. This procedure may be frightening for parents and their children. Many parents are also concerned about the safety of transfusions. While blood supply in the United States is considered very safe, parents

    Read More
  • Sinusitis and Your Child

    Sinusitis is an inflammation of the lining of the nose and sinuses. It is a very common infection in children.

    Read More
  • Sleep Problems in Children

    Sleep problems are very common during the first few years of life. Problems may include waking up during the night, not wanting to go to sleep, nightmares, sleepwalking, and bedwetting. If frantic upset persists with no apparent cause, call your child's doctor.

    Read More
  • Sleep Problems: Your Child’s Sleep Diary

    Children differ in how much sleep they need, how long it takes them to fall asleep, and how easily they wake up. If you are concerned about your child’s sleep habits, talk with your child’s doctor. Your child’s doctor may ask you to keep a sleep diary to help track your child’s sleep habits.

    Read More
  • Start Reading to Your Child Early

    A baby can enjoy books by 6 months of age! Here are things you can do with your child at different ages to help your child learn to love words and books.

    Read More
  • Starting Solid Foods

    Rice, oatmeal, or barley? What infant cereal or other food will be on the menu for your baby's first solid meal? And have you set a date?

    Read More
  • Temper Tantrums

    It's hard for a young child to hold strong feelings inside. Young children often cry, scream, or stomp up and down when they are upset. As a parent, you may feel angry, helpless, or ashamed.

    Read More
  • Temper Tantrums

    It's hard for young children to hold strong feelings inside. When they feel frustrated or angry, they often cry, scream, or stomp up and down. This is a temper tantrum. Temper tantrums are a normal part of your child's development. They usually begin around age 12 to 18 months, get worse between 2 and

    Read More
  • Toilet Training

    Teaching your child how to use the toilet takes time and patience. Each child learns to use the toilet in his or her own time. Here is information from the American Academy of Pediatrics to help guide you and your child through the process.

    Read More
  • Toilet Training—Autism Toolkit

    Children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) often have slowed development, may be stuck on their own routines, or may be nervous about learning a new skill. They may not understand how to copy the steps using the toilet, or they may not understand the words parents are using. Many children with ASD

    Read More
  • VIS—Your Child’s First Vaccines

    The vaccines covered on this statement are those most likely to be given during the same visits during infancy and early childhood.

    Read More
  • When a Baby’s Head Is Misshapen: Positional Skull Deformities

    Many parents wonder if the shape of their newborn's head is normal. Maybe it seems a bit flat in the back or uneven on one side. Most of these slight imperfections happen when infants spend too much time in one position such as in a crib, a car safety seat, or an infant carrier. The good news is that

    Read More
  • Young Children Learn A Lot When They Play

    When young children play with children close to their own age, they learn: how to cooperate, when to lead and when to follow, and how to solve problems. Read more about the importance of play for children.

    Read More
  • Your Baby's First Steps

    Learning to walk takes practice. Each child will learn to coordinate and balance at different rates. You can expect some wobbling and falling down at first, but before you know it, your child will be running circles around you.

    Read More
  • Your Child and the Environment

    Environmental dangers are everywhere. Most of these dangers are more harmful to children than adults. However, there are things you can do to reduce your child's contact with them. Read more to learn about how to protect your family from environmental dangers.

    Read More
  • Your Preemie’s Growth: Developmental Milestones

    Information from the American Academy of Pediatrics about developmental milestones for your preterm baby (also known as preemie).

    Read More

Our Location

Find us on the map

Hours of Operation

Phone lines turn on half an hour before opening for appointment scheduling.

Monday:

8:00 am-12:00 pm

1:00 pm-5:00 pm

Tuesday:

8:00 am-12:00 pm

1:00 pm-5:00 pm

Wednesday:

8:00 am-12:00 pm

1:00 pm-5:00 pm

Thursday:

8:00 am-12:00 pm

1:00 pm-5:00 pm

Friday:

8:00 am-12:00 pm

1:30 pm-5:00 pm

Saturday:

9:00 am-12:00 pm

Sunday:

Closed

What our patients say about us

  • "Both of my children were patients of TAPAC, and I can only say Very Good Things about all the services offered. Even when my kids were older, they chose to continue to see Dr. Sara Mulder through college, and I'm so grateful for her care of their physical, mental, and emotional needs during this time of growth. Thank you to all of you who make up the amazing team that is TAPAC."
    Carla W.
  • "I really appreciate the trouble they go through to keep the kids safe during this whole covid thing. Separate docs for healthy kids vs sick. Nice front desk staff. have a doc that specializes in asthma."
    NICKLUKE N.
  • "We have had nothing but great experiences here at TAPAC. This practice is equipped with very knowledgeable clinical staff and very friendly administrative staff. Our son is comfortable here and loves seeing his primary Dr Koehler but has also had great experiences with Dr Stilwell and Dr Mulder."
    TRINH E.
  • "We couldn't be happier with Dr. Mulder. She always takes wonderful care of my kids. Listens to my concerns and never rushes us."
    Katie S.
  • "I was in the area on vacation with a sick kid. They were able to get me in the same day very quickly and help us out. They were very accommodating and helpful."
    Bryant E.